Mac Migration

After 5.5 years, I was upgraded to a new Mac at work. The old Mac tower is still serviceable, but it was struggling to process video footage while also allowing me to run Tweetdeck and Google Chrome for other tasks. The new Mac arrived about a month ago and it took till today to get everything transitioned over to the new iMac.

Digital Signage
The biggest hang up was the licensing for the software which runs our digital signage. I was running an older version on my old Mac which worked very well. However, the company doesn’t support that version for OS X Sierra, so an upgraded was needed. In order to do that, my old Mac had to be upgraded two versions, then have the licenses transferred to the cloud. I then had to contact the company so they would then release the licenses to be accessed via the new Mac. Our system admin then took care of doing the double upgrades + OS X upgrade on the six player machines. I spoke with customer service twice during this process. At least a dozen support emails went back and forth.

Font Incompatible
With that in place and having copied all my remaining items off the old computer, I made the leap today to the new machine. Immediately I ran into a problem: the font we use for our branding doesn’t work with the iWorks software. Over on apple.com, I had to sign in, contact support via chat, they called me, I was put on hold three times, and then finally a nice guy named Nick picked up. He remote viewed into my machine to see the problem for himself. After several checks verifying the problem, he told me that yes, the font just isn’t compatible.

What I was seeing is that every time I hit a hard return in Pages or Keynote, a quote mark would show up at the end of the line. The guy recommended that I contact the font company for support on getting a Mac-compatible version of the font. I had used this font for 5.5 years on the old Mac. I’ve found an open source alternative which I’m using in the meanwhile while waiting on further instruction from my boss.

Google Chrome
Trusty ol’ Google Chrome also failed too. I know on other devices that if I log the browser in, everything will cross-populate over to the new system. That did not happen here. I ended up using a separate extension to backup all my tabs and then move them over to the new machine.

PC
Our system admin wound up on the floor helping me pull out cords as we tried to figure out why my PC’s monitor suddenly stopped working too during the transition. When I had to leave to get on desk, he was still tugging at cords. When I returned an hour later, the monitor was on.

Overall, this process has been quite exhausting!

New Census Bureau Tools for Businesses

I just saw a very exciting update from the U.S. Census Bureau. The Census Bureau has two new features for businesses:

* Regional Analyst Edition (click on My Location to have it auto-generate the location)
* Census Business Builder: Small Business Edition

These tools will help businesses better target their customers. I’m interested in this thanks to my previous work with my colleague, Mallory, on tools librarians can use to help their business patrons.

2017 Candidate for LITA Director-at-Large

Surprise!

My big secret is now out! The list of other candidates for this position and Vice-President/President-Elect are available online as well. The election is March 13th through April 5th. I appreciate your consideration of my candidacy.

As you can tell from my statement, I couldn’t keep my UX soul from creeping in. The main highlights of my background include:

  • Advisory Board member for ALA Office of Information Technology Policy
  • Participation in two LITA Task Forces
  • Co-creator of the LITA 3D printing/Maker Technology Interest Group
  • Co-founder of LibUX
  • The “muscle” behind the Global Map of 3D Printers in Libraries
  • 2015 ALA Emerging Leader

Read my full list of qualifications.

I’ll be running my election stuff over at @alagoodman since my usual one has been taken over by the real world.

Wanted: Help Archiving the EPA Website

I’ve found a way to make myself useful. I’m adding pages from the EPA’s website to the Internet Archive. As such, I’ve found perhaps hundreds of pages which are not archived yet. This bookmarklet is easier to use than the official one. Why? It does it within the page w/o opening a new one.

What to Do
* Install the bookmarklet above to your browser.
* Go to a page of links (like the first one in the following section) and then CTRL + left click on all the links.
* Then go through each page clicking the bookmarklet.
* When you’re done, work your way back across each open tab by clicking the back button. Then scroll down and look for additional links + PDFs.
* Close the tabs as you work your way back across them.
* Sometimes it’ll time out so you need to hit the back button, then try the bookmarklet again.

Things to Know
* If it’s a PDF, it usually downloads to your computer. Annoying. Right now I don’t know how to get those in the Internet Archives, but hold onto them.
* If the PDF is hosted online, you can click the bookmarklet to add it to the Internet Archive.
* If the website/page doesn’t allow robot.txt, you can’t add it to the Archive.
* If you notice that you’re working through pages which have been recently archived, go find another set to go through. It’s a better use of your time to find pages which have never been archived before. These random reports haven’t gotten any IA love before.

Pages to Start With
* Air Research Products in the Science Inventory
* Science Inventory pages

If you’re interested in strategically going through the EPA site with me, let me know. We can make a plan of action to go through and get the pages in.

New Micro Report: Clicks in Weekly Events Email

I still feel like I have no idea what I’m doing in developing reports, but this week’s attempt at finding meaningful information is to send a new micro report. It goes to the Head of Adult Programming and the Children’s events coordinator. I list the top 5 events clicked on per category. My ultimate goal is to help event planners be able to better predict their audiences based upon email interactions. This is part of my strategy in reducing descriptions in weekly events emails to just titles + date. If people want to know more, they’ll click through and thus provide us with valuable information.

Now if I can get a steady pipeline from people on their attendance stats…

First Time Experience with Facebook Live

In that LJ marketing class, a speaker talked about livestreaming with Facebook Live. We talked about it at work and finally the stars aligned when I was signed up to attend Stephanie’s Bullet Journal class. She emailed me yesterday and asked if I’d like to film her presentation. Sure! You can see her video below and my notes on the experience below.

Prep Work
I over prepared by bringing up a laptop, soundproof headphones, and my phone. My intentions were to film while listening in to the stream on the computer as a quality check. It quickly became apparent that the FB Live was about 5 seconds behind the real thing which was hard to handle. I eventually closed the laptop. My phone was plugged into the laptop to sustain its power hunger for the entire hour and seven minute presentation.

Setup & Camera Movement
Stephanie sat at the end of the table and I sat on the right side of the table about two feet from her. Since our Facebook page is a business account, you have to download the Page Manager app, not the Facebook one. The live button is hidden. You need to go to your account page then click on post. From there, you have an option to choose live. It seems to default to the camera facing you.

For the most part, my elbows were drawn close to my body so I could just see her from the elbows up. When she talked about something on-screen, I’d turn the camera and then pinch in on my screen to zoom. Then I tried to be fancy and pinch out simultaneously when moving back to Stephanie herself. The footage timed out twice when it disconnected from the staff’s WiFi.

Audience Response
I was able to very slowly like people’s comments and reply. At the end of the program, around 750 people had been exposed to the Live event, 220-ish had popped in, we had 16 likes, and a handful of comments. Not bad for a first adventure!

Health Hazards
It’s hard to hold your phone that long. My hands started cramping up. The worst pain was a stitch in my right side. At times I felt like I couldn’t breathe completely. This could be because I re-aggravated my previously impinged rotator cuff on Sunday. At the end, I was very, very tired.

January Hits Hard

We’re having a very busy time this month. January is typically a slow month for both people coming in the door and programming. However, things are bouncing in publicity. This week I’m dealing with trying to get less mass emails sent out, pushing five major projects out the door at once (timing guys, we gotta do better next year), and so many emails. Drowning in them.

My colleague is giving a talk on fake news tonight. She sent me her slide deck to go over. I’m grateful she got the general layout and composition done. The formatting of it took 90 minutes for 45 slides. I’m eager to hear how many people attended the event. We got some traction from people about 30 minutes away.

Our videographer and I had an hour-long meeting with the Head of Public Services today. We presented her with three different video projects. Two are immediate and one is longer term. She gave some highly needed feedback which substantially shifted the direction of one video. The best part of the meeting was her lighting up as she discussed romance as a genre. She’s an absolute delight to listen to with how passionate she is about the power of readers’ advisory. I have zero skills/interest in that area, so it’s great to see an expert go.