The Finished Summer Reading Website

Property of Darien Library

Property of Darien Library

From the screenshot above, you probably can’t tell much about changes from the finished product to the previous one I wrote about. Oh, you’d be mistaken. Let me show you a little bit about what happened behind the curtain:

The site took around 25 hours to complete. This is despite the fact that I was working on top of a framework that I established three years ago. The issues are numerous such as there not really being a CMS to work with. Any style change I make on the front page will show up on the logged-in homepage. The logged-in version has additional content. This content climbs on top of the content that was already there. So you have to figure out a way to assign classes to the logged in vs. logged out versions of the same tables (yes, tables).

Tim Spalding was very kind to take a look at it and suggested a workaround. Then while looking for the place to change some text on a pop-up, I discovered a Javascript entry area. Hallelujah — I would not have been able to do this without this access. My spouse helped me put together some code which injected new classes into the logged in vs. logged out pages based upon the URL. THEN Firefox continued to be terrible, so I had to put in special targeted CSS just for Firefox. The site would look fantastic on every other browser except Firefox. This has been my experience for years with this browser.

The backend of the site is not divided into one master stylesheet but into many stylesheets per page. Yes, page level. So if I set the background to be X, Y, and Z on the homepage, I had to visit every other page and set up that new background code. It made the process very long and drawn-out.

Property of Darien Library

Property of Darien Library


My favorite part
My coworker sent me the image from the front of their summer reading brochure. I took it apart in Photoshop and added shadows, removed the spotlights, and created a semi-repeating pattern to use as the background. When I added that to the site, I realized I wasn’t happy with it. So I then pulled apart the curtain into multiple layers (with the courtesy of a transparent background and an eraser). I then ran drop shadows over the new individual rows. I then ‘shopped them back together.

What I didn’t incorporate
My colleague’s original design included spotlights. I wanted to add spotlights which would sway gently or slowly warm up. Something cool with CSS3. However, by the time I got to the end of getting it structurally working, I was done. So done.