First Time Experience with Facebook Live

In that LJ marketing class, a speaker talked about livestreaming with Facebook Live. We talked about it at work and finally the stars aligned when I was signed up to attend Stephanie’s Bullet Journal class. She emailed me yesterday and asked if I’d like to film her presentation. Sure! You can see her video below and my notes on the experience below.

Prep Work
I over prepared by bringing up a laptop, soundproof headphones, and my phone. My intentions were to film while listening in to the stream on the computer as a quality check. It quickly became apparent that the FB Live was about 5 seconds behind the real thing which was hard to handle. I eventually closed the laptop. My phone was plugged into the laptop to sustain its power hunger for the entire hour and seven minute presentation.

Setup & Camera Movement
Stephanie sat at the end of the table and I sat on the right side of the table about two feet from her. Since our Facebook page is a business account, you have to download the Page Manager app, not the Facebook one. The live button is hidden. You need to go to your account page then click on post. From there, you have an option to choose live. It seems to default to the camera facing you.

For the most part, my elbows were drawn close to my body so I could just see her from the elbows up. When she talked about something on-screen, I’d turn the camera and then pinch in on my screen to zoom. Then I tried to be fancy and pinch out simultaneously when moving back to Stephanie herself. The footage timed out twice when it disconnected from the staff’s WiFi.

Audience Response
I was able to very slowly like people’s comments and reply. At the end of the program, around 750 people had been exposed to the Live event, 220-ish had popped in, we had 16 likes, and a handful of comments. Not bad for a first adventure!

Health Hazards
It’s hard to hold your phone that long. My hands started cramping up. The worst pain was a stitch in my right side. At times I felt like I couldn’t breathe completely. This could be because I re-aggravated my previously impinged rotator cuff on Sunday. At the end, I was very, very tired.

Four Versions of Email Text

This week I’ve taken on something that I wasn’t sure about doing — ghostwriting text for other people. I started doing this because it’s the fastest way to get things written. We’re sending out a fundraising email next week and I rewrote the copy to be more like a personal letter in the voice of my colleagues who usually write the text. They’re not really here this week, but I’ve been typing up their newsletters for 3 years so I’m familiar with their style.

Then this morning, I realized that I hadn’t heard back from a colleague for her opening paragraph in this week’s events email. She was on desk and I realized the fastest way to handle this is to simply type up a few different versions and let her select one. I hoped she’d personalize her favorite, but she did not. Can you guess which one she choose?

Take One
Can you spot fake news? Social media has made it harder to determine if something is true or not. In this one-hour class on Fake News or Real News, I’ll show you how to determine for yourself if something you read is a credible piece of information.

Take Two
As librarians, we are asked every day to verify if websites, books, or articles can be trusted. Is the information they contain factual, an opinion, or propaganda? In this one-hour class, I’ll show you how to determine for yourself if something you read is a credible piece of information. We’ll look at tall-tale signs that information may be inaccurate and how to find out where the information came from.

Take Three
Win online debates by backing up your statements and debunking false ones! In this one-hour class, I’ll show you how to determine for yourself if something you read is a credible piece of information. We’ll look at tall-tale signs that information may be inaccurate and how to find out where the information came from.

Take Four
How do you know if an online story is real or fake news? It can be tricky with emotional words tapping into the high stress of the 24/7 news cycle. Learn how to spots the signs of inaccurate news and how to find out the truth via credible sources in this one-hour class.

Answer: Take Four

Note: I just remembered that I did my first ghostwriting about a month ago.

Friday’s Project: Stuffed Animal Sleepover Teaser Video

One of my questions in the LJ Successful Library Marketing class was about how to advertise something. I worked with my colleague Krishna to film this short video. When I uploaded it to Instagram, I realized that I had to go and make a change so it’d work in that square formatting. It’s still a little rough there since I was in a hurry, but it does the trick.

Shelf Marker

Courtesy of Darien Library

Courtesy of Darien Library

This is just the end of a shelf marker. The whole thing is the size of a bookmark which includes the following text:

* Title
* Author
* Description
* Reminder that this is an always available title

I spent a lot of time revising this project, then sending in a help ticket to get it laminated properly. I also met with my colleague to discuss revising the museum brochure, working on a publicity plans for museum passes and another one for the January book sale.

Escape the Laboratory Poster

Courtesy of Darien Library

Courtesy of Darien Library

It’s been a hard week, but I like this poster I designed for an upcoming Escape Room project. The accompanying website will be built next week. The lady’s head and the two objects coming off the sides will be supported by additional supports on the back of the foam board poster. I worked on the design of the poster with my coworker Krishna.

Note: the beaker behind the E drives me nuts. I tried moving it around, but that didn’t look right either.