Understanding Our Patrons Presentation

For an internal presentation, I developed a slidedeck based on the months of work my colleagues and I did to better understand our patrons. I won’t share the whole slidedeck, but some images are included in this post as illustration.

The first part dealt with departments categorizing their users into groups which share similar characteristics. They answered some questions about what users want, how they connect with us, and how we could do better by them. The second part was for me to crunch some data. The third involved surveying patrons guerilla-style. I’m still working on that last part.

We have some travelers!

Image is from a fascinating site. Click the image to see what I mean.

Do you know about this Google feature?

Four Layouts of Summer Reading

Our library uses the incredible art of Lisa Nowlain for our children’s summer reading program. It made it significantly easier to develop the web pages which support our four programs (pre-readers, kids, teens, and adults). This week I found out that even when we print out the trees at the size of children, they still look fresh.

Courtesy of Darien Library

Landing Page
To start my work, I sketched out a bunch of layouts for the children’s page. The head wasn’t there when I dropped by the Children’s Library, but her staff choose the design. The layout is almost identical to the Darien Olympics theme of last summer. I then selected my favorite for the landing page for all four programs. It took awhile as I had to create a large PSD file and duplicate the trees across it. The original wooden sign has tiny legs. I duplicated and extended them a little to complete my desired look. The buttons below are not what I wanted. However, the little wooden signs which fill up the brochure don’t work for the web. I have no idea why. So I used the plain ol’ generic default Bootstrap button for our website. I could have chosen another color, but the blue was the best default option.

Courtesy of Darien Library

Kids Page
Likewise, on the kids’ page, I cut off the legs on the sign to make it shorter. The PDFs are massive. I tried to squish them, but it became illegible. Maybe the watercolor background contributed to that? The location of the images is a little funny in order to make it usable on mobile. The tall tree and the kids collapsible below the information. Trying to get the blocks all to the same length was frustrating.

Courtesy of Darien Library

Teens
The background image for the teens page is from another artist (I’m unsure if he wants the attention). I struggled mightily with how to handle all the information on the teen page. The photos are all public domain. The struggle on this page are those movie covers. I ended up giving up on this yesterday. There are actually two more movies. The layout is a row with three columns. Each column has a row with three columns. When I blew the code out so I could look for the problem, it didn’t make sense. There should be enough room in it for up to 12 covers. But when I add in the extra ones, the images disappear and the date wraps to the second line. After 90 minutes, I finally gave up on it at the urging of my coworker. I’m displeased with that, but every tactic I tried failed. I don’t want to have rows with five or six images in it because then the covers are too dominating for the page.

Courtesy of Darien Library

Adults
I worked closely with colleague Virginia in developing the Adult Summer Reading page. She rejected my original header image and sent me three new ones to choose from. I selected the beach chairs. The challenge here was to keep her from the burden of creating a booklist for every single item on the Book Bingo Inspiration list. I managed to find some stuff on the website that would work. Then tasked her with developing 5 or 6 new ones just for this purpose. Her funniest chat was “What steampunk novel would you recommend?” for the new genre list.

The Book Readers Festival is another iteration of reusing Lisa’s artwork in new ways. I needed to make a flyer in a hurry so it could be posted around town. I opened up Canva looking for inspiration. I spotted it right away. Then I adjusted it for the design you see. It now exists as that image + flyer + poster which hangs over the front desk.

Marketing
I’m copying the URL of the pages into a Google URL builder, setting up the tags, and then copying that link into Bitly. I look forward to seeing what the numbers look like at the end of August.

Publicity Award Winners

My library had the great honor of receiving three awards for our publicity this past year: our website, poster, and thematic (three or more related pieces). I have, pictured here, the items which were done mostly in my hand. Krishna gave generous assistance in the development of the Escape the Laboratory poster.

Lonely Planet Bookmarks

Lonely Planet Sign

Lonely Planet Digital Sign

Lonely Planet Digital Sign

Lonely Planet Sign

Lonely Planet Shelfmarkers

Image Finding

Not centered

Today one fundraiser ended so I was free to change out the header images on our website and social media accounts. This turned out be a tough challenge for our website. My general topic was “flowers, spring.” I hunted around my favorite public domain image sites. Over the course of an hour, I checked nine images. The final one made it up though it’s not exactly what I wanted. Conditions for the frontpage image:

* Wide enough
* Not too dark
* No white background (text is white)
* Not too busy
* Image can’t be centered since the search box and text is there
* Bottom right center has to be dark for the text
* If focused on a single object, it can’t be centered

Since I decided to do a last ditch promotion of the Big Library Read, I tried to find a nice pie image. There were some good ones to choose from, but they didn’t fit the conditions above.

Collapsible FAQ

A little piece of work which I’m fairly happy with is this collapsible FAQ for our new WiFi page. It’s just some Bootstrap.

Closed:

Open:

It took a few variations to figure out the best layout for it. Originally I had screenshots from a Mac, PC, iPhone, iPad, and Android phone. Then I downsized and dropped the iPad. It’s listed first here since it’s the most common iOS for our users.

New Email Layouts

email_layouts_2016

The only thing that mattered to me today is setting up two different email designs for the weekly events email. Above is a sneak peek. I just sent the newer design off to three reviewers to see what they think. The new one is mobile-first, reduced images, and more playful. I reviewed MailChimp’s inspiration site for ideas before trying something new.

The email design might get rejected for not including summaries of the events. That was a concern the last time I ran the weekly email and was testing designs. This week’s email has 20 different events in it. They get long fast. I’m trying to tighten them up while still being bold and readable. We’ll see how it goes over tomorrow when they see that design…

On a good note, my boss complimented me on yesterday’s Need to Know emails about the new publicity workflows. A+ to me.

DDoS Left Me with TinyURL

I noticed immediately something was up when I couldn’t load Twitter. As the publicity manager, it made things a little annoying at work yesterday since I had some tweets to send out. However, it really got my goat when I was forced to use TinyURL for a short URL instead of Bitly which was apparently also a victim of the attack. It did bring to the forefront an idea I’ve had for years: get our own custom URL shortener. I already have an idea of what I want it to say. It’s a secret for now until I see if I get approval for it. Anyways, here on my glorious (ha!) flyer, you can see the impact of the DDoS attack:

Courtesy of Darien Library

Courtesy of Darien Library

Yesterday’s production items also included an author poster, creating a FB ad, and making a handful of digital signs. Then I kicked Outlook on desktop repeatedly as it ate my first weekly events email that I’ve sent out in a few years. By eat I mean that it randomly added a hard line breaks into two blocks. Since the email design is based on columns, this set everything else under it to wiggle sideways in confusion. I tried duplicating a working block into one of the bad spaces. That was fine. As soon as I changed the text, it acted up. Then a lovely tech support lady from MailChimp spent an hour helping me. She couldn’t get it stop happening either.

Ah! I have lots of plans for this email. I’m guessing that by Christmas it’ll look entirely different.

Finally, I had a one-on-one. Their original item they had asked for tech support wasn’t available, so I taught them how to use another device instead. The main thing I took out is that I love having a phablet. It’s big enough to see!

New Library Website: Request a Study Room Form

I’ve received permission to blog about my work on our library’s new website. We kicked off this project on May 5, 2015. Later I’ll write more about what we’ve been up to till now. For tonight, let’s look at the Request a Study Room Form.

Features:

  • If you enter a card number which doesn’t start with 21517, you get directed to a Whoops! page.
  • If you are a ***** card holder, you can then make your reservation. You may not request any date in the past, further than 30 days out, today, or on any day the Library is scheduled to be closed through the end of 2018.
  • Shows the Library’s hours when you go to enter your time request.
First Screen

First Screen

The form is built using JotForm as introduced to me by Andromeda Yelton. The theme is customized by me to match our new website’s design aesthetic which is built on top of Bootstrap. JotForm allows me to create a highly customized theming, conditional logic, and filter submissions to the appropriate person. This particular form is only going to our reference department, so that is straight forward. I have additionally customized the submission form email so our logo is in the header. JotForm’s customer service is also top-notch. I was having trouble getting the conditional logic to work the way I wanted it to and their responses were fast.

If you're not a resident, you see this message.

If you’re not a resident, you see this message.

We’re pretty strict with who can reserve study rooms in advance. They’re a really hot commodity. The conditional logic here looks for the first few numbers of the card and if it doesn’t match our system, you get the above message. The wordsmithing is my own, but will likely be improved by the Head of Reference later.

The calendar limits what a user can do.

The calendar limits what a user can do.

If you get through the screening process, you now see the reservation form. Initially, I had wanted the form to be hidden based upon conditionals, but the “Whoops!” message showed up even before you got to the end of the line. So I broke this form into three sections: library card number, Whoops!, make a reservation request. This worked out beautifully. I then hid the back/next buttons so people couldn’t “escape.”

Anyways, the calendar here shows that you can’t reserve for today (CSS trick) nor can you book more than 30 days out per our rules. It’s a pretty sweet setup. The weakness here is that I can’t limit you from requesting a time when we’re closed. The workaround method is that when you get to the time, a little hover shows up with the Library’s hours.

Once the form is submitted, you are told that you’ll receive a response by tomorrow. On the staff side, you get the little submission form which shows all the in-take information. We then make the reservation using an Outlook calendar.