Genealogy for Kids Program

Today my colleague Krishna and I hosted “Discover Your Family Story” program for children grades 3 to 6.

Participants will begin a family tree, learn how to conduct an oral history interview and learn about library resources that can help you discover your family story.

The materials took me four hours to put together. Do my research, design the program and the craft project (seen above), cut out 12 trunks and leaves and 200 nametags for the trees, and put together the handouts. The most interesting part were people texting their relatives to ask, “What were the names of your grandparents? I only knew them as Pop…”

This Week’s Small Victories

I’ve been rather busy at work to the point where I’ve had to turn people down who bring me last minute project requests. However, I’ve managed to complete these tasks:

* Analyze 3 months of email data on our weekly events email
* Recycled a four year old poster for a last minute request
* Designed the images needed for a double-sided physical giveaway
* Create a new poster for a festival
* Turn around-on-a-dime a new fundraising page
* Came up with a (clever-to-me) hack to make the fundraising page more mobile friendly using a button, anchor links, and white text
* Figured out how to draw a family tree diagram as an actual tree for next week’s genealogy class I’m teaching to children
* Do a complete sign and printed materials photo audit
* Started the professional development resource I’ve been asking Twitter about (the sortable, filterable, and search feature randomly broke, so it’s a WIP)

There’s also been an unusual new patron pattern. Four times in the past week, I’ve helped someone and then they look me in the eye, smile widely and say with more affection than I do for most things, “I love you.” Maybe everyone just needs a little love right now?

Collapsible FAQ

A little piece of work which I’m fairly happy with is this collapsible FAQ for our new WiFi page. It’s just some Bootstrap.

Closed:

Open:

It took a few variations to figure out the best layout for it. Originally I had screenshots from a Mac, PC, iPhone, iPad, and Android phone. Then I downsized and dropped the iPad. It’s listed first here since it’s the most common iOS for our users.

Pi Day Blizzard Email

My hobby is making nice throwaway emails like this. The design is a default theme available from MailChimp. I realized later that I should have made the adult programs plural. There was a last minute change and I had to get the email out, so I missed it. There’s a lot going on in the text which I’m not 100% happy with it. Everyone likes clicking on Jen’s recommendation from Hoopla though so that’s a success.

Courtesy of Darien Library

People Read to the Bottom

Courtesy of Darien Library

One question I’ve had is wondering if anyone ever read to the bottom of our weekly events email. It’s somewhat hard to tell since clicks aren’t overwhelming positive. However, this week I finally got a definite response to our Did You Knows:

* 50: CSA Farm Share
* 19: HBO’s Big Little Lies booklist
* 24: Save the date for an event

That’s HUGE for us. I’d like to thank our director and the Head of Adult Programming for helping me select the items we’d feature in the DYKs. Each week I put in three items.

Publicity Plan for WPA-enabled WiFi

Today we launched our new WPA-enabled WiFi which requires a password to log on. We’ve provided the password on our website, on a digital sign, and on tabletop signs throughout the Library. The publicity plan for this was quite heavy, though we scaled back some pieces in the end:

* Setup periodical reminders for the weekly events email
* As a Did You Know item in the weekly events email
* Library News (viewed on the patron’s dashboard when they log in)
* Facebook post
* Twitter post
* Update the Computers and Technology page
* Write a WiFi page for the website
* (Accidentally) Write a brief FAQ on online security (the questions initially came from the head of reference)
* Tabletop signs
* Digital sign
* Message on public computers’ login screen
* Did You Know item for the website
* Blurb on the FAQ page

The most time-consuming piece was writing the online security page. It was like a snowball — once you started writing, you’d realize that you need to define something else. In my mind, the confused faces of patrons asking “Browser?” kept pushing me to simplify and leave no details out. We’ll likely need to continue to tweak the language a little bit, but this is the starter page for online security.

New Census Bureau Tools for Businesses

I just saw a very exciting update from the U.S. Census Bureau. The Census Bureau has two new features for businesses:

* Regional Analyst Edition (click on My Location to have it auto-generate the location)
* Census Business Builder: Small Business Edition

These tools will help businesses better target their customers. I’m interested in this thanks to my previous work with my colleague, Mallory, on tools librarians can use to help their business patrons.

2017 Candidate for LITA Director-at-Large

Surprise!

My big secret is now out! The list of other candidates for this position and Vice-President/President-Elect are available online as well. The election is March 13th through April 5th. I appreciate your consideration of my candidacy.

As you can tell from my statement, I couldn’t keep my UX soul from creeping in. The main highlights of my background include:

  • Advisory Board member for ALA Office of Information Technology Policy
  • Participation in two LITA Task Forces
  • Co-creator of the LITA 3D printing/Maker Technology Interest Group
  • Co-founder of LibUX
  • The “muscle” behind the Global Map of 3D Printers in Libraries
  • 2015 ALA Emerging Leader

Read my full list of qualifications.

I’ll be running my election stuff over at @alagoodman since my usual one has been taken over by the real world.